Damon Albarn's Dr Dee live session - video ]

Damon Albarn, among other things the multi-talented Blur and Gorillaz frontman, visits the Guardian studio with a baroque ensemble to perform two songs from his opera Dr Dee. The opera charts the life of mathematician, occultist and royal consort John Dee (1527-1609), and comes to the English National Opera in June. The group perform two tracks, O Spirit, Animate Us, in which the old John Dee prays to God along with his daughter, as well as Apple Carts”

via

richardashrowan:

Moon, Sun, Elements, Fire. John Dee (1527–1608) describes a line as a point that flows… “Consequently, everything, properly, began from the point and the monad.” (II) and “a LINE is produced from the FLOWING OF A POINT. And using this same principle, we point out that this is also the case in our mechanical magic, because the lines indicating our elements are produced by the continuous fall of DROPS (which are like physical points) [moving] as though they are FLOWING.” (VII) 
These passages are from Dee’s Monas Hieroglyphica (1563), a work in which Dee provides an exegesis of his famous Monad symbol, which seems to operate not just symbolically, but as an alchemical geometric cypher containing a kind of magical agency in its own right.    
The translated sections (parts of Theorem II and Theorem VII) are from Nancy Turner and Teresa Burnes. The images are composited together from microfilm scans (by Bill Heidrick) from a copy held at UCBerkeley.

richardashrowan:

Moon, Sun, Elements, Fire. John Dee (1527–1608) describes a line as a point that flows… “Consequently, everything, properly, began from the point and the monad.” (II) and “a LINE is produced from the FLOWING OF A POINT. And using this same principle, we point out that this is also the case in our mechanical magic, because the lines indicating our elements are produced by the continuous fall of DROPS (which are like physical points) [moving] as though they are FLOWING.” (VII) 

These passages are from Dee’s Monas Hieroglyphica (1563), a work in which Dee provides an exegesis of his famous Monad symbol, which seems to operate not just symbolically, but as an alchemical geometric cypher containing a kind of magical agency in its own right.    

The translated sections (parts of Theorem II and Theorem VII) are from Nancy Turner and Teresa Burnes. The images are composited together from microfilm scans (by Bill Heidrick) from a copy held at UCBerkeley.

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